Tag Archives: development

Service accounts with Ruby and the google api client

  1. Goto https://code.google.com/apis/console
  2. Create a new project
  3. Under services, select Google Analytics
  4. Goto API Access of a new project
  5. generate a new oAuth credential, selecting “service account”.
  6. Download your p12 cert file

 

In Google analytics, use the service account email address and assign it as a new administrator to the desired GA profile.

On ALL servers destined to use the service account to GA, install and syncronized with ntp.  If your even 500ms off, you’re going to have a bad time with “Grant_invalid” messages.

In a testbed project, make 2 files: Gemfile & testbed1.rb ( you’re going to create a lot of these testbed files on your own ).

Gemfile

source "http://rubygems.org"
gem 'google-api-client'
gem 'pry'

testbed1.rb

require 'pry'
require 'rubygems'
require 'google/api_client'
 
keyFile = "SOME_KEY_GOES_HERE-privatekey.p12"
 
cID = "YOUR_SOOPA_SECRET_SA"
 
scope = 'https://www.googleapis.com/auth/analytics.readonly'
email = 'YOUR_EMAIL_GOES_HERE@developer.gserviceaccount.com'
 
 
#Normally it would be bad to put the passphrase here, but aftet talking to several dozen devs, everyone's pass phrase is not a secret
key = Google::APIClient::PKCS12.load_key(keyFile, "notasecret")
 
asserter = Google::APIClient::JWTAsserter.new(
   email,
   scope,
   key)
 
puts asserter.authorize()
 
binding.pry

If all goes well, the JWTAsserter instance will get a valid token and no exceptions/errors will be thrown. If you’ve followed all of the steps listed earlier and things are still breaking, troubleshooting paths are: Verify your machine time is correct, verify your service account email address is bound to google analytics, and lastly you might need to wait until Google platform catches up with the changes. For myself, it took 9 hours until my account finally authenticated through. Google has potentially a million or more servers organized into cells, the fact that they seem to cooperate well doesn’t mean they’re perfectly in sync at all times.

Otherwise if all else fails, I recommend stalking this guy Nick https://groups.google.com/d/msg/google-analytics-data-export-api/maa_fyjD2cM/sT8tDDh0wNsJ – It seems like he’s a Google employee on the service account dev/implementation team and generally stuff gets fixed if he says it’s getting fixed.

As I run into any more troubles, I will update and add more notes.

metaclass service bus decorator concept

While playing around with some idea’s for making PyProxy completely overridable ( and also potentially undebuggable ) I started playing around with metaclasses.

Below is from my toxic directory [ gist url ]

from collections import defaultdict
from functools import wraps

Just some preliminary basic utilities

A simple bus implementation, decoratedCalls is a dictionary of service calls, with a list
of callbacks to each service call hook.

decoratedCalls = defaultdict(list)
 
def call(name, *args, **kwargs):
    print name, args, kwargs
    if name in decoratedCalls:
        for cb in decoratedCalls[name]:
            cb(*args, **kwargs)

Syntactic suger to add clarity later as to what functions are being bound to what. Adding in
debug/logging hooks here could allow for easier tracing of what is called for what methods.

class Subscribe(object):
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
 
    def __call__(self, f):
        decoratedCalls[self.name].append(f)
        return f

Here’s the actual bus decorator, very simple just wraps the decorated function with a pre and post bus calls.

 
class BusDecorator(object):
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
 
    def __call__(self, f):
 
        @wraps(f)
        def decorator(inst, *args, **kwargs):
            call("%s-pre" % self.name, inst, args, kwargs)            
            retval = f(inst, *args, **kwargs)
            call("%s-post" % self.name, inst, retval)            
            return retval
        return decorator

And here’s my Bus Metaclass that combines most of the above.

The ease of wrapping the target class is accomplished by cdict which is a dictionary of
every defined attribute of the target class. As you can see it’s trivial to spin
through and decorate every callable with the BusDecorator

 
class BusWrap(type):
 
    def __new__(mcs, clsname, bases, cdict):
 
        modName = cdict.get("__module__", "unknownclass")
 
        for name in cdict.keys():
            prefix = "%s.%s.%s" % ( modName, clsname, name)
            if callable(cdict[name]):                
                cdict[name] = BusDecorator(prefix)(cdict[name])
 
        return type.__new__(mcs, name, bases, cdict)

Now give a dirt simple class like

 
class Foo(object):
    __metaclass__ = BusWrap
 
    def __init__(self):
        print "init'd"
 
    def bar(self):
        print "bar"
 
    def blah(self):
        print "blah"
 
    def ich(self):
        print "ich"
 
    def ego(self):
        print "lego"
 
    def say(self, *args):
        print "Saying ", args

And two service handlers to pre Foo.bar being called and after Foo.ego is called

 
@Subscribe("__main__.Foo.bar-pre")        
def preBar(inst, *args, **kwargs):
    if not hasattr(inst, "ext_info"):
        inst.ext_info = "Here"
 
@Subscribe("__main__.Foo.ego-post")
def postEgo(inst, *args, **kwargs):
    if hasattr(inst, "ext_info"):
        print "Extended info is ", inst.ext_info

Our test shows….

x = Foo()
x.bar()
x.blah()
x.ich()
x.ego()
x.say("abba", "dabba")

this as output

__main__.Foo.__init__-pre (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, (), {}) {}
init'd
__main__.Foo.__init__-post (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, None) {}
__main__.Foo.bar-pre (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, (), {}) {}
bar
__main__.Foo.bar-post (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, None) {}
__main__.Foo.blah-pre (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, (), {}) {}
blah
__main__.Foo.blah-post (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, None) {}
__main__.Foo.ich-pre (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, (), {}) {}
ich
__main__.Foo.ich-post (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, None) {}
__main__.Foo.ego-pre (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, (), {}) {}
lego
__main__.Foo.ego-post (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, None) {}
Extended info is  Here
__main__.Foo.say-pre (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, ('abba', 'dabba'), {}) {}
Saying  ('abba', 'dabba')
__main__.Foo.say-post (<__main__.__init__ object at 0x02637890>, None) {}


TxWeb Alpha – A different spin on twisted.web

I’ve spent some more time on my current pet, txweb, and I think it’s pretty much at the as good as it gets stage.

Below is the source for the example.py

 
#App level
from txweb import Site, expose
#twisted
from twisted.web import server, resource
from twisted.internet import reactor
from twisted.web.static import File
 
from os.path import abspath, dirname, join

Mostly pretty standard imports for a twisted.web application.

Now here is the “Controllers”, they’re stripped down to bare-bones just to keep it simple

class PageOne(object):
 
    @expose
    def foo(self, request):
        return "Hello From PageOne Foo!"        
 
    @expose
    def delayed(self, request):
        def delayedResponse():
            request.write("I was delayed :( ")
            request.finish()
 
        reactor.callLater(5, delayedResponse)
        return server.NOT_DONE_YET
 
 
class PageTwo(object):
 
    @expose
    def index(self, request):
        """ /pagetwo/index """
        return "Hello From PageTwo index!"
 
 
rootFile = lambda filename : abspath(join(dirname(__file__), filename))
 
class Root(object):
 
    @expose
    def index(self, request):
        """
            Will handle both / and /index paths
        """
        return "Hello From Index!"
 
    @expose
    def __default__(self, request):
        """
            Unless overriden further down, this will catch all 404's
        """
        return "I Caught %s " % request.path
 
    pageone = PageOne()
    pagetwo = PageTwo()
 
    readme  = File(rootFile("README.md"))
    license = File(rootFile("txweb/LICENSE.txt"))

Basically a txWeb enabled twisted service converts a URL path to an Object path.

So /hello/world could resolve to root.hello.world() if such a construct was provided.

Much more importantly, with the above example, /license resolves to the local file txweb/LICENSE and /readme resolves to README.md !

In summary txweb doesn’t throw away the epic amount of work the Twisted developers and volunteers have put forth, it just presents it in another way.

PyProxy – Aka the development Helper proxy

Coming out of nothing and into supah doopa Alpha is finally a working proof of concept of my python web proxy. I don’t really want to talk about the asinine alternatives I’ve tried until I finally said “fuck it, time to go completely twisted!” Low and behold the actual proxy part is 4 lines of code, which is then expanded to maybe 20-30 to allow for overloading some lower level classes.

Originally a public announcement for this project would have been in August at the earliest, give me time to clean things up and go from proof of concept to working concept but apparently a lot of other people have similar thoughts and I figured it’s better to collaborate then compete.

So some quick notes:
The ultimate goal for PyProxy ( or whatever it ends up being named ) is to sit between a developer and a development server. The first and immediate idea for this was to automagically parse out Python mechanize scripts to replicate the traffic. These mechanize scripts could then be collected into a suite, marking other scripts as requirements ( example login process ). That alone would make it pretty easy to create full system under test unit-tests. The next idea was to add in regex or pattern based hooks that could allow a developer to dial in to a specific domain, or even a specific set of webpages.

After that, the idea was to just continually tack on support plugins and scripts, maybe tell PyProxy the name of the target application’s database, and if it’s MySQL, switch on the general log. This could allow for combining both mechanize scripts AND a SQLObject or SQLAlchemy powered unit-test suite to assert that the correct data was changed.

The final future idea was to make a Firefox/Chrome extension that would allow a developer to control some parts of the proxy from their browser and also see additional information. For Python and PHP web apps, imagine have a finalization plugin that appended a response header listing all File’s used to perform a request…. then imagine having a “click to edit” button that, if the dev. instance is workstation local, would have your favorite IDE open the specified file for editing.

All in all, I think these are really subtle idea’s that if combined together, would cut down some mudane parts of developing a web app.

GitHub repo (https://github.com/devdave/PyProxy) here

Komodo IDE auto-generating setters/getters for PHP

I’ve got about thirty auto-generated PHP Doctrine models that are missing their required Java style setters/getters. At class number three of typing in these accessory methods I snapped and said “There has to be a better way” and magically the universe smacked me upside the head and reminded me that I’m using Komodo IDE which just so happens to have a disgustingly powerful Python powered macro system.

Four minutes later, out came the copy & paste hacked together monstrosity below. It’s not perfect but it doesn’t need to be, just has to work well enough to save my sanity and my client’s time.

To use, follow Komodo’s help documentation for creating a new python Macro then copy and paste this code into the macro window OR a slightly easier way, make the macro then click the “edit macro” context menu property to open the macro source file as a new view in Komodo.

The macro uses some very simple rules. It’s only looking for private properties in a format of “^\s*private \$[a-zA-Z0-9_]$”, it collects all of these variable names and then appends them through the setter and getter templates to a string buffer. Finally the buffer is
inserted into the current document at the position of the cursor. The output is coherent but not whitespace friendly which isn’t too big of a deal to re-format. Note, the macro has no concept of PHP syntax, so if there is more then one class in a file, the results will not be desirable.

 
from xpcom import components
import re
 
viewSvc = components.classes["@activestate.com/koViewService;1"]\
    .getService(components.interfaces.koIViewService)
view = viewSvc.currentView.queryInterface(components.interfaces.koIScintillaView)
 
sm = view.scimoz
sm.currentPos   # current position in the editor
sm.text         # editor text
sm.selText      # the selected text
#sm.text = "Hello World!"
 
output = u"\n"
 
setterTemplate = """
    function set%s($value){
        $this->%s = $value;
    }
"""
 
getterTemplate = """
    /**
    *@return string
    */
    function get%s(){
        return $this->%s;
    }
"""
 
propertyTemplate = """
%s
 
%s
"""
 
prefixSize = len(u"private $")
 
def formalName(rawName):
    return u"%s" % "".join([part.title() for part in rawName.split("_")])
 
 
 
 
#todo find a better way to split lines, what if its Mac or Windows format?
for line in sm.text.split("\n"):
    if line.strip().startswith("private $"):
        #trim of the private $ and trailing semi-colon
        realName = line.strip()[prefixSize:-1]        
        output += propertyTemplate % ( setterTemplate %(formalName(realName), realName), getterTemplate % (formalName(realName), realName))        
 
 
 
sm.insertText(sm.currentPos, output)

JQuery dataTable plugin quick notes

Server-side processing

To return the names of the columns you want, you need to use aoColumndefs and provided individual objects with the property sName.

Below is most of the implementation for a jeditable Ajax driven dataTables, this is the Alpha version and still needs a lot of love in places, but the gist of it is here

var semesterTable = $("#semesterViewTable").dataTable({
                "bProcessing"   : true
            ,   "bServerSide"   : true
            ,   "sAjaxSource"   : "<?php echo url_for("roster/ajax/{$semester_id}"); ?>"
            ,   "fnRowCallback" : function( nRow, aData, iDisplayIndex, iDisplayIndexFull ) {
                                    //console.log(nRow, aData, iDisplayIndex, iDisplayIndexFull);
                                    var recordId = aData[0];
                                    $("td", nRow).data("recordId", recordId);
                                    return nRow;
                                }
            , "fnDrawCallback"  : function(){
                                    $("td.editableMajor")
                                        .editable("<?php echo url_for("roster/edit_record");?>",
                                                    {                                                        
                                                          loadurl: "<?php echo url_for("roster/distinct/major/{$semester_id}") ?>"
                                                        , type: "select"
                                                        , submit: "OK"
                                                        , method: "post"
                                                        , submitdata: function(){
                                                            console.log(this, arguments);
                                                            var $this = $(this);
                                                            return {
                                                                    recordId: $this.data("recordId")
                                                                    , classes: $this.attr("class")
                                                                }
                                                        }
                                                    });
 
                                }
            /* Seriously a meta-generator for this would be nice */
            ,"aoColumnDefs": [
                ,{ sName:"record_id",          aTargets:[00], bSearchable:false, bVisible:false }
                ,{ sName:"roster_date",         aTargets:[01], sClass:"roster_date"}
                ,{ sName:"roster_name_both",    aTargets:[02], sClass:"roster_name_both"}
                ,{ sName:"roster_student_id",   aTargets:[03], sClass:"roster_student_id"}
                ,{ sName:"roster_major1",       aTargets:[04], sClass:"roster_major1 editableMajor"}
                ,{ sName:"roster_major2",       aTargets:[05], sClass:"roster_major2 editableMajor"}
                ,{ sName:"roster_major3",       aTargets:[06], sClass:"roster_major3 editableMajor"}
                ,{ sName:"roster_major4",       aTargets:[07], sClass:"roster_major4 editableMajor"}
                ,{ sName:"roster_minor1",       aTargets:[08], sClass:"roster_minor1 editableMajor"}
                ,{ sName:"roster_minor2",       aTargets:[09], sClass:"roster_minor2 editableMajor"}
            ]
    });

For the tbody, just put something like

        <tbody><tr><td>Chill the fuck out, it's loading</td></tr></tbody>

Server side data contract

dataTables expects a JSON’ified construct like this

$responseBody = array(
		"sEcho" => intval($input['sEcho']),
		"iTotalRecords" => (int) $count,
		"iTotalDisplayRecords" => count($data),
		"aaData" => $data
            );
  • sEcho is a security variable used by dataTables, basically just send it back and don’t worry about it
  • iTotalRecords – is the MAXIMUM # of records in the data set without any filtering
  • iTotalDisplayRecords – is the MAXIMUM # of records in the data set WITH filtering
  • An array of numerically indexed arrays, dataTables doesn’t like associative arrays

Total and Display total records

If the blink tag still worked reliably, I’d put a neon sign here. Basically you need to do 3 queries per Ajax call… call 1 is to get a

 
   SELECT count(1) FROM sourceTABLE

call 2 is

 SELECT count(1) FROM sourceTable WHERE someCriteria 

and finally call 3 is

 SELECT yourColumnList FROM sourceTable WHERE someCriteria

With memcache or such, I’d advise caching the total count but no matter what you unfortunately need to make these three SQL calls :(.

Advanced collision detection

Unfortunately I haven’t gotten the chance to completely read this ( http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/blog/2011/03/25/speculative-contacts-an-continuous-collision-engine-approach-part-1/ ) but what I’ve read has been very educational and potentially useful for future game development.

A quick synopsis is that the linked article provides a very well documented approach for dealing with collisions in time. Say you have an object that should have collided with another, but it’s velocity or translation across the drawing surface is so high that in the time between frames it completely skips over another entity without colliding. In physical reality there would be a collision, but in computer terms there isn’t easy logic to detect and resolve these false-negative near misses.

Snake game prototype

Running live here

User input is fed off the left & right cursor keys.

Ping additions included a formalized Quad tree library into the ping.Lib namespace but I want to fix up the factory function I wrote to take an instance of the Canvas rendering class instead of manually writing out the root dimensions. Otherwise collision checks are still a tad wonky… there’s a high propensity for near misses unfortunately 🙁

Hosting local, the ghetto fabulous way

One of the first big draws of Ruby on Rails in late 2006 was the ability to host my development environment locally. Not only did this cut down on the chore work of developing in an environment, but it probably also boosted productivity for me substantially. A year later when I started teaching myself Python, another nail was hammered into the coffin that is my opinion of PHP. That said, I’ve toyed with a lot of different idea’s of hosting a PHP environment locally but to a degree stymied in the effort.
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